First LEED Certification for Transit Worldwide Launched | U.S. Green Building Council
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LEED certification pilot poised to boost the sustainability and efficiency of transit globally; Delhi Metro Rail Corporation announced as first adopter

New Delhi, India—(February 15, 2017)—Today, USGBC and GBCI announced a new LEED green building rating system pilot designed to address the unique needs of transit systems around the world. Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) will be the first metro in the world to pursue the pilot, LEED v4 O+M: Transit, for their metro stations in Delhi NCR and other states in India.

Performance of the metro stations will be monitored via the newly released Arc performance platform, which facilitates streamlined tracking of data across five performance categories; energy, water, waste, transportation and human experience. Developed with invaluable input from DMRC, LEED v4 O+M: Transit will allow operational transit facilities to benchmark efficiencies and demonstrate continual improvement. Transit owners can reduce their environmental footprint, while also engaging riders on the importance of sustainability and the opportunity the public transportation sector has in minimizing greenhouse gas emissions.

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Associate Project Manager for Architecture, LEED AP BD+C, O+M, ID+C, ND, HOMES | WELL AP | CDT | Green Classroom Professional, New York City Housing Authority
I really like the idea of LEED for Transit Systems. In browsing the standard, it would be difficult to implement a number of the prerequisites and credits for older, existing systems. I do think the "Transit Specific Strategies for Innovation" could be greatly expanded upon for subway/light rail and bus systems. In fact, this should really be where the bulk of the rating system is. Another area that could use LEED implementation is the design and manufacture of rolling stock. New subway cars in the US can cost up to $2 million each. If more sustainable, reusable materials and equipment can be implemented, then it should. Not only equipment, but also noise levels should be reviewed, as many new trains have, at least in my opinion, very annoying, high-pitched sounding propulsion systems. These sounds should be more melodic and pleasant to listen to. In fact, it's worse than the older non-new-tech equipment (such as SMEE-era subway cars in NYC) that were used in trains until the 1980's. More requirements for LED lighting. More pleasing colors for subway car interiors (I'm tired of the sterile light-blue seat, white wall and black floor scheme). Not only that, but some cities in the US now send their subway and other transit vehicles through a mid-life rebuild (at about the 20-year mark) that adds more years to the vehicle's life span, as well as newer technologies. I know Mumbai is a very new system, so it's options are more than a 100-year old subway like New York City. An opportunity may have been missed with the new Second Avenue subway that recently opened in New York. As it is to be extended over the next several decades, this would be a good opportunity to for LEED to try and make some inroads in North American transit. Of course, this is just my opinion, but there's a lot of potential for LEED in many other cities, even those that have aging transit systems. Thank you.

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